Sunday, June 28, 2009

Ho'oponopono and Questions: A Perfect Time for "Thank You"

The ancient Hawaiian process of Ho'oponopono evokes all kinds of reactions -- wonderment, confusion, defiance, impatience, and peace are only a few. Having attended many training seminars, I've always appreciated the questions people ask. These are in me also.

Dr. Ihaleakala Hew Len often invites questions, and yet it can feel intimidating to ask them. I myself have asked many, and I'm sure I've exceeded his exasperation limit from time to time. :-) Even after those times, he's sincerely thanked me and others.

That's right. Once the answer is provided, the question-asker often says "Thank you." But then after that, Dr. Hew Len often says, "Oh no, thank YOU."

Why would anyone say "thank you" for exasperating questions?

Questions arise in us because we're unclear, and revealing this might feel embarrassing. Yet, they're also opportunities to clean -- in fact this is the only reason they come up.

If no one in the room had this issue or memory "in" them, the question would simply evaporate. The issue can even be within the person teaching the seminar. Thus when someone asks about it (possibly not recognizing its timeliness for others too) cleaning can happen right there.

Maybe the more something exasperates us, the more it's a "live" issue or memory in us -- and it's asking for release. So THANK YOU, dear question askers, for giving my memories words. I can let them go, now, because you've reminded me.

Can you imagine being given any greater gift than that?

There's a game called "Ice Breakers" on the internet. In this game, multi-colored squares of "ice" are arranged in a moving puzzle. The object is to match same-colored blocks 3-4 at a time, by shifting them around as you can. When you make these matches, ZAP! The blocks are carried off, and then more come. There are obstacles and many, many rounds. You win a round when you "zap" enough matched blocks.

Of course, I've never gotten all the way through the game (yet).

We're all full of such multicolored memories that block Inspiration from coming through. When someone asks a question, it can match something in us . . . and we can choose to clean. Then, ZAP! Divinity can transmute it. Of course more blocks come -- it's life's ongoing process.

In Ho'oponopono, our purpose in life is to clean clogged-up memories, breaking the ice in our hearts and recognizing who we really are (Self-Identity). Fueled by Divine Inspiration, there are endless ways to do this. Learning about many more cleaning tools -- and how to get our own personal ones as well -- is part of Ho'oponopono training seminars. I am grateful.

Peace Begins with Me,
Pam

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